Mammography

If you're a woman 40 years of age or older, you should have a mammogram every year.

Schedule your mammogram today by calling us at (307) 335-6250 or (307) 857-3462, 3D mammography is available at the SageWest Riverton campus. 

Did you know that one in eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime? That’s why it’s important to begin annual mammogram screenings at age 40. Regular mammograms are essential to early detection and the fight against breast cancer. In fact, with early detection, the five-year survival rate for breast cancer is 100 percent.

At SageWest Health Care, your breast health is important to us. Our caring staff uses the latest technology – like 3D mammography – in a comfortable and welcoming environment to help you stay on top of your health and give you the peace of mind that comes with knowing and being prepared.

What is 3D mammography? 3D mammography is a type of digital mammography which uses advanced technology to take images of your breast from different angles and combine them to create a more complete and accurate image of your breast than is possible with regular 2D digital mammography.

3D mammography follows the same basic procedure that you’re probably accustomed to with regular 2D digital mammography. 3D lasts just a few seconds longer, slightly extending the time of minor discomfort you may feel and the low-risk radiation exposure involved with all forms of digital mammography.

Why should I get a 3D mammogram? The more complete and accurate image of your breast generated by 3D mammography allows us to detect breast cancer earlier and more effectively than traditional 2D mammography, so that we can take action to help you fight.

3D mammography is particularly effective if you have dense breast tissue or have been given a previous cancer or lesion diagnosis.

And 3D mammography’s higher accuracy means less unnecessary return visits to the doctor for false positives that turn out to be non-cancerous.

What does all of that mean for you? Greater peace of mind.

How can I get a 3D mammogram? To schedule a 3D mammogram, give us a call at 857-3462 or 335-6250.

When you take control of your preventive health, we’re in a better position to work with you to detect any issues that arise and to help you fight them every step of the way.

Be your own ‘breast friend,’ and schedule your 3D mammogram today.

Lowering the Risk

Unlike colorectal cancer, which can be prevented via the removal of polyps during a colonoscopy, there is no sure way to prevent breast cancer. But there are steps women can take that might reduce their risk of breast cancer, or at least help them find it in its earliest, most curable stages.

These steps include:

  • Maintain a healthy body weight

  • Regular exercise

  • Limit alcohol use

  • If you are over the age of 40, have an annual mammogram

Women who breast-feed their children for several months or do not use post-menopausal hormone therapy (PHT) may also reduce their breast cancer risk.

Most doctors feel that early detection tests for breast cancer save thousands of lives each year, and that many more lives could be saved if even more women and their health care providers took advantage of these tests.


Other Breast Cancer Facts

  • The average patient's age with a new breast cancer diagnosis is 62. Living longer increases one's risk. Risk rises after age 40, which is why annual mammograms are recommended by the American Cancer Society for women over the age of 40.

  • American Caucasian women develop breast cancer more often than African American, Native American, or Asian women.

  • Women who have had breast cancer on one side face an increased risk of getting cancer in the other breast. This is particularly true when breast cancer genetic risk is inherited.

  • One's risk increases if there is a strong family history of breast cancer. This is true if there are relatives on either the maternal or paternal sides who have been affected. Risk is higher if there are multiple relatives who have had breast cancer, if the relatives are "first-degree" relatives - mother, sister, daughter, and if the relatives were diagnosed at a pre-menopausal age.

  • Studies suggest that the longer a woman is exposed to estrogen, the more likely she is to develop breast cancer. This includes estrogen made by the body, taken as a drug, or delivered by a patch. Also at increased risk are women who began their periods before age 12, never had children, took hormone replacement therapy for long periods of time, or experienced menopause after age 55.

  • Women who have their first child after age 30 have a greater risk.

  • Five to ten percent of women who develop breast cancer are born with a mutation in breast-cancer-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Families with inherited susceptibility to breast cancer generally have multiple generations affected, a higher incidence of ovarian and other gynecologic cancers, male breast cancer, or onset of cancer in young individuals. Genetic testing and counseling can be done in affected or unaffected family members if warranted. Certain genes routinely keep breast cells from dividing and growing out of control and forming tumors. When these genes become altered, changes occur and a cell no longer can grow correctly. Genetic changes may be inherited from either parent.